ETHICS EDUCATION IN UNIVERSITY IS KEY

“Maybe we’ll never be the ‘richest black nation in the world’ and perhaps we don’t need to be, but I certainly hope that we can become the most harmonious and the most happy black nation and in order for that, moral and ethical values are an essential part,”

Ethics and moral values-based education offered by Divine Word University can play an important role to help “Take Back PNG”, said the University’s Deputy President Prof Philip Gibbs.

Prof Gibbs when addressing the 19th Business Ethics Symposium at the University recently said ethically grounded graduates can improve the management of the national affairs of the nation.

“Ethics and moral values are included in every program of DWU so I hope this university can play an important role in taking back PNG from the hands of those involved in the corrupt business practices,” said Prof Gibbs who is also a Catholic priest from the Divine Word Missionaries congregation.

“Maybe we’ll never be the ‘richest black nation in the world’ and perhaps we don’t need to be, but I certainly hope that we can become the most harmonious and the most happy black nation and in order for that, moral and ethical values are an essential part,” said Prof Gibbs.

The annual symposium organized by the Business Department of the Faculty of Business and Informatics was held under the theme “How wonderful it is for business professionals to ethically live and work together harmoniously in the business world”.

Speakers included Ms Elly Karo, an accountant with the World Bank and an alumna of DWU, Mr Barry Namongo also a graduate of the university and BSP Madang Branch Manager and Mr Lazarus Towa, a Humanitarian Development Advocate as the keynote speaker.

Mr Namongo told the students: “You will be faced with decisions to make in every business be it public or private, make sure your decisions are always value based. Have a set of ethical values to guide you and more importantly, you have to live those values.”

Ms Karo said: “Most of the work in my role as a World Bank accountant has now been taken over by technology.

“A very important aspect also is that you must value yourself as you matter, your job may be very demanding but always make time for yourself and create a balance.”

As for Mr Towa, “Determination and the right ethics is the key to success.” He spoke of having come from a background where he had lost both his parents at a very young age,

shared experiences of how he met his own needs and struggled to keep going in this education world because he told himself, I can and will do it.

Mr Towa said he uses Facebook to help people to effectively find employment voluntarily, and has been recognized and bestowed several awards nationally and internationally for his work.

When asked by a student on the best advice to get that dream job, Mr Namongo responded, “Work hard when you start somewhere.”

Ms Karo’s response was, “Start small and work your way up, it molds you for that top post” and it was straightforward for Mr Towa, “Do voluntary work, it’ll definitely stand out on your CVs.”

September 9, 2019